House Considers Cyber Security Legislation

Under the leadership of Chairman Mike Rogers (R-MI) and Ranking Member Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD), the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (HPSCI) passed the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (HR 3523)  out of committee on April 17, 2012.  The Rogers-Ruppersburger bill is focused on minimizing the cyber targeting of U.S. businesses by nation-states for theft of valuable intellectual property and sensitive information.  HR 3523 amends the National Security Act of 1947 in order to add provisions regarding cyber threat intelligence and information sharing.  It allows cyber security providers to use such systems to protect the rights and property of the protected entity by identifying and retrieve cyber threat information.  It regulates the use and protection of shared information.  Although HR 3523 does not mention healthcare information, it could have general implications for healthcare and health information technology companies in that the bill provides strong liability protection for companies that choose to protect their own networks or share threat information and it could have overall intellectual property and information privacy implications.

Among the other cyber security legislation currently being considered by the Congress are included:
HR 2096 – Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2011, as amended (Sponsored by Rep. Michael McCaul / Science, Space, and Technology Committee)
HR 3834 – Advancing America’s Networking and Information Technology Research and Development Act of 2012 (Sponsored by Rep. Ralph Hall / Science, Space, and Technology Committee)
HR 4257 – Federal Information Security Amendments Act of 2012 (Sponsored by Rep. Darrell Issa / Oversight and Government Reform Committee)
HR 3674 – PRECISE Act, or Promoting and Enhancing Cybersecurity and Information Sharing Effectiveness Act of 2011 (Sponsored by Rep Daniel E. Lungren (CA)/ Committee on Homeland Security, Oversight and Government Reform, Science, Space, and Technology, the Judiciary, and Intelligence

House Considers Cyber Security Legislation

Under the leadership of Chairman Mike Rogers (R-MI) and Ranking Member Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD), the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (HPSCI) passed the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (HR 3523) out of committee on April 17, 2012. The Rogers-Ruppersburger bill is focused on minimizing the cyber targeting of U.S. businesses by nation-states for theft of valuable intellectual property and sensitive information. HR 3523 amends the National Security Act of 1947 in order to add provisions regarding cyber threat intelligence and information sharing. It allows cyber security providers to use such systems to protect the rights and property of the protected entity by identifying and retrieve cyber threat information. It regulates the use and protection of shared information. Although HR 3523 does not mention healthcare information, it could have general implications for healthcare and health information technology companies in that the bill provides strong liability protection for companies that choose to protect their own networks or share threat information and it could have overall intellectual property and information privacy implications.

Among the other cyber security legislation currently being considered by the Congress are included:

HR 2096 – Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2011, as amended (Sponsored by Rep. Michael McCaul / Science, Space, and Technology Committee)

HR 3834 – Advancing America’s Networking and Information Technology Research and Development Act of 2012 (Sponsored by Rep. Ralph Hall / Science, Space, and Technology Committee)

HR 4257 – Federal Information Security Amendments Act of 2012 (Sponsored by Rep. Darrell Issa / Oversight and Government Reform Committee)

HR 3674 – PRECISE Act, or Promoting and Enhancing Cybersecurity and Information Sharing Effectiveness Act of 2011 (Sponsored by Rep Daniel E. Lungren (CA)/ Committee on Homeland Security, Oversight and Government Reform, Science, Space, and Technology, the Judiciary, and Intelligence

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